Saturday, April 25, 2015

Florence Italy and Liberation Day


Dear Art Lover,


     I found myself in a part of Firenze, Italia, that I do not visit often.  And there was a ton of construction around the Viale and the Fortezza, so I found myself taking long detours on my bicycle as I worked my way over to the lab of an Italian acquaintance.  Giovanni, a poet on the side, wanted to show me how he could help me with my art business, with CDs, video, and other types of promotional products.  I am not really interested in publicity materials, but I am trying to brainstorm a way for more people to be able to enjoy visual art sort of along the lines of how writers and musicians have an advantage over we artists because they can really reduce their expenses by allowing fans to electronically download books, poems, and songs. So, now that I explained something about the art business and what I am trying to do, Giovanni and I are both thinking on it!


Church in Florence Italy Firenze Italia

      But I digress.  I mostly just wanted to share with you some images that you do not usually see when you see images of the Renaissance City.  This town has so much more to offer than most tourists (and even this “local”) is likely to discover without some effort.  So, I share with you some fun images.  

Florence Italy Firenze Italia

     Note the sign alerting people of potential electrocution by the bridge . . .  hahha.  

Florence Italy Firenze Italia

     And the street scene was fun.  I started to photograph the boys sitting out on their balcony.  Only later when I got home did I realize that they and the garbage man in the street were looking at something my way… how convenient!

Florence Italy Firenze Italia

     I just realized how many images I have of the ride home, so I will wait until tomorrow for those images.  Today is Liberation Day in Italia.  I know a family in Casignano just outside of Florence.  Renato is in his early 90s, but when I met him, he told me of his childhood memories of how American soldiers came to stay in his home in the hills.  They helped the Italians liberate their city near the end of WWII.  

     Now, I obviously had nothing to do with this, but I benefit from the actions of my countrymen so many years ago.  Italians in general have an affection and fondness for Americans that might only be matched by how Americans feel towards la bella Italia.  No one should ever celebrate war, but we can celebrate love, sharing, and a victory over oppression and violence.

Happy Liberation Day, Italia!


Peace,
Kelly

~ Kelly Borsheim, sculptor, painter, writer, teacher

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I do not understand why D day is the liberation of Europe, when Italy was liberated first and as far as I know part of Europe. Anyone have an answer?

Kelly Borsheim said...

hmmm, of course war and even naming stuff is not my forte'.
I am guessing that this perhaps is another situation of the victors writing the history, or at least A history.

Two sites (I cannot vouch for verity since I know very little about war, or the accuracy of ... much of anything):

http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/italy/liberation-day
Liberation of Italia is considered to be April 25, 1945.

D-Day is considered to be 6 June 1944.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normandy_landings

In any event, you have a point (in my mind at least).
D-Day refers to the FIRST Day of an invasion on Normany.
Liberation Day, is the day for Italian Liberation.

Europe is not really mentioned... but I would guess that one could say the "Liberation of Europe" would be the final day of war.

Does that even exist?

I do not understand, actually, how it is called the "Liberation of Italy" when the Italian leader Mussolini seemed in cahoots with Hitler.
Most of the wiki links I read about WWII seem to refer more to Invasion of Italy.
But perhaps this liberation idea was later when the Italian people decided that Mussolini did not represent them??
In that case, they would have indeed been "Liberated."

Gadget

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