Monday, January 21, 2008

Melancholia and Innocence


I read today an online article entitled, “In Praise of Melancholy” by Eric G. Wilson. Here is an excerpt that I hope you enjoy:

Melancholia pushes against the easy "either/or" of the status quo. It thrives in unexplored middle ground between oppositions, in the "both/and." It fosters fresh insights into relationships between oppositions, especially that great polarity life and death. It encourages new ways of conceiving and naming the mysterious connections between antinomies. It returns us to innocence, to the ability to play in the potential without being constrained to the actual. Such respites from causality refresh our relationship to the world, grant us beautiful vistas, energize our hearts and our minds. . . .

Suffering the gloom, inevitable as breath, we must further accept this fact that the world hates: We are forever incomplete, fragments of some ungraspable whole. Our unfinished natures — we are never pure actualities but always vague potentials — make life a constant struggle, a bout with the persistent unknown. But this extension into the abyss is also our salvation. To be only a fragment is always to strive for something beyond ourselves, something transcendent. That striving is always an act of freedom, of choosing one road instead of another. Though this labor is arduous — it requires constant attention to our mysterious and shifting interiors — it is also ecstatic, an almost infinite sounding of the exquisite riddles of Being.

To be against happiness is to embrace ecstasy. Incompleteness is a call to life.”

Read More
http://chronicle.com
Section: The Chronicle Review
Volume 54, Issue 19, Page B11

1 comment:

Rodney said...

Aw melancholia how problematic how
simple. Everything you say is true. And in enjoying this thought I'm sure that melancholia first introduced yin and yang...Rodney