Sunday, November 5, 2017

Adjustable Bases Sculpture



Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy


Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy


Dear Art Lover,
    
     I mentioned in the last post that the legless-ness of the giant horse bronze sculpture made me wonder if the artist Gustavo Aceves intended to exhibit this piece closer to the ground or perhaps “floating” above water, as if the horse’s legs were submerged.

     In any event, the massive base elevating this sculpture is very interesting.  Having been married to an engineer, as well as having done a lot of weekend-type shows to sell my beeswax candles and later, my art, I have been fascinated with collapsing furniture design.  Or at least, flexible, in the sense of how to use it.  You might imagine how expensive it must be to create a support structure for every single public and temporary art exhibit a city might have. 

     So, look at the design of this base.  The strong rectangular beams are supported on round columns every so often.  Yet, they may attach in several different angles due to the pie-shaped wedges on the top of each pier.  Simple, wonderful, versatile!  Great.  Painted black, the support beams are almost ignored by the brain as far as aesthetics of the art go, but physically imposing enough to keep the viewer at a natural distance for protection of all concerned.  You may note that the leveling on the ground is done simply by adding slabs of plywood as needed to keep the pillars on the same plane.
Related posts:


Today, I would like to show you one of my pastel drawings.  Bologna, Italy, is famous for its porticos [covered walkways] and I was fascinated my first time in that city by how small this man I drew looked beside and within the architecture.  This image gives me peace and also curiosity, as I wondered what he was watching or thinking.  I liked also his child-like pose.  I hope that you do, too.
 
Pensive in Bologna, Italy original pastel figure painting for sale framed
Shown Unframed, but comes with Museum Glass, frame, and mat
Please contact me if you are interested in this artwork.

"Pensive in Bologna"
23" x 17"
Pastel on Wallis Pro Paper
by Kelly Borsheim
$1500
[Framed with offset white mat, black wood frame, & Museum Glass, a non-reflective glass]
For close up views of the original art, click on this link:
http://www.borsheimarts.com/pastels/2010/PensiveInBologna.htm

Peace and thank you,

Kelly Borsheim, artist
Art buying Pensive in Bologna Framed Museum Glass non-reflective



Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

horse's ass bronze

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Versatile sculpture base public art installation Italy

Friday, November 3, 2017

Gustavo Aceves Horse Sculpture




Here's lookin' at you, Kid!


Dear Art Lover,
     Near Piazza Verdi in Lucca, Italy, not so long ago, I discovered a wonderful public art exhibition of horses and about migration [of people].  My last post: 
featured images of Mexican sculptor Gustavo Aceves multi-figure “Passo Sospesosculpture work of humans and horses.  The entire show is titled “Lapidarium” and is just wonderful!       

     I quote part of the sign for this sculpture grouping [I rewrote a little to correct the poor translation to English]:
     These sculptures represent a sort of “monument to the vanquished,” a metaphor of the unceasing migration process over thousands of years. 
Gustavo Aceves, Mexican sculptor, Lucca, Italy, sculpture exhibition, public art, horse sculpture, Lapidarium, immigration, migration
The leglessness made me wonder if the artist wanted this sculpture exhibited just above water.

     This truly monumental horse has his body split in half.  The back half has a tall form attached, perhaps representing a rider?  Behind that tall shape is a skull attached to a space along the “spine.”  There are backwards numbers (like many license plates) stamped into the torso of the horse, large sets and then many smaller ones.  I am not sure if the bones mounted at the top back end of the front half of the horse are to imply starvation or something else.  Compositionally, it aids the eye to look to the back half of the sculpture, with its gracefully curving top line mirroring the line of the horse’s neck.

Human skull along the spine

Gustavo Aceves, Mexican sculptor bony addition aids composition
Bony addition aids composition

Gustavo Aceves, Mexican sculptor, Lucca, Italy, sculpture exhibition, public art, horse sculpture, Lapidarium, immigration, migration

Gustavo Aceves, Mexican sculptor, Lucca, Italy, sculpture exhibition, public art, horse sculpture, Lapidarium, immigration, migration


     The blue-green patina (frankly, the easiest to create in bronze, other than black) contrasts nicely with the warm greens of the surrounding grasses and trees.  I think it is in a lovely spot, along the wall of Lucca, where it may be seen from within and down below along the road that circles the wall.  Perhaps you will get to see this exhibit?  Please pardon the big black spot in my pictures.  I need to buy a new camera since this is not-repairable, but I have had a lot of expenses this year and am postponing the shopping.
     Enjoy… I hope not too many photos! 

Happy birthday, Bob Barton!  


Peace,

Kelly Borsheim, artist

P.S. IF original art, while affordable, is STILL a bit out of your budget, or the piece you adored has sold?  Or do you like arty things in different formats, to surround yourself with art?  Looking for a gift?  See my store online for pillow, phone cases, shower curtains, towels, tote bags, and yes, even prints on metal, wood, canvas, and so much more:

bronze horse head public art Lucca, Italy

horse sculpture bronze equine art Lucca Italy

numbers represent people en masse

skull showing the real risk of migration bronze sculpture

Lucca Italy park path along the Medieval wall surrounding the city

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Gustavo Aceves Lapidarium Sculpture



Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Dear Art Lover,
     I found myself in Lucca, Italy, recently, at the invitation of a new friend.  As the bus entered the station at Piazza Verdi, I saw the heads of horses.  They were sculptures and I was intrigued.  Knowing that I was early, I decided to wander over to have a look.  So glad that I did… and later, I even brought my friend over.

     Mexican sculptor Gustavo Aceves has created two massive sculpture works [one a single piece; the other an amazing parade] that is temporarily on exhibit in Lucca [I never saw for how long].  It is titled “Lapidarium,” although the only sign about the work implies the title is “Passo Sospeso” [Suspended Step] I will write about the large bronze horse in the next post.  This post is about the grouping of fifteen horses [the sign says, count if you like] that are exhibited “within” the famous wall around Lucca, in what appears to be a sunken area with arches.  My friend explained that the water and aqueducts passed by those arches behind this sculpture installation.

    I quote part of the sign for this sculpture grouping [I rewrote a little to correct the poor translation to English]:
     These sculptures represent a sort of “monument to the vanquished,” a metaphor of the unceasing migration process over thousands of years.  Part of a larger group, these sculptures travel along to many important sites around the world, such as Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, and an archeological area in Rome (Mercati di Traiano, l’Arco di Costantino e la Piazza del Colosseo).  After this exhibition leaves Lucca, Italy, it will travel on to the Acropolis in Athens, Beijing, and Paris.  In 2019 it will arrive in Mexico, the birthplace of the author.

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art

gate enclosure Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
the gate aids the impact of the message, no?

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art


Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art     The artist has obviously used the same mold to create the horses, the male African-inspired figures that stand atop some of the horses, and I think even the grouping of skulls that line the torsos of the three horses in the rear of the “parade.”  Repetition is a common compositional device.  It gives us a feeling of calm, continuity, cohesion of the separate items as a whole, and sometimes security.  Our brain catches onto the pattern and completes and continues it, feeling good about the order of things.  However, too much repetition creates boredom, precisely for the reason that the brain knows what to expect and needs not look further.  In a large sculpture, such as this grouping, it makes economic sense for the artist to do this as well.  


Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Repetition and Variety

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
One feels the exhaustion and struggle, yet anticipation [standing figures]

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
My apologies for the dark spot in the upper left white on the wall-need a new camera.

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Bus Station at Piazza Verdi is off to the left - wall of Lucca, Italy

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Even the holes on the neck of the fallen horses are repetition
 
     That said,  the artist Gustavo Aceves, has then used other compositional means to break up this repetition.  Each horse is different in content.  Some have been cropped, with only the neck and heads positioned as some of the fallen during the great migration.  The horses still walking are positioned in slightly different angles to imply movement and individuality within the group.  But more importantly, and visually and intellectually stimulating, the bodies of the horses are unique.  Some of the bodies have wooden sticks and even masts or crosses, implying migration by ship.  One shows the famine in the exposed rib cage of a horse.  Some of the horses have large stitching across a leg or a face to imply how the journey wounds and yet, the march continues.  Others have human figures tied to wooden sticks, depicting slavery.  There is one horse that carries the load of horses hooves inside his back/wagon. 

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
The train tracks were another reinforcing visual to the idea

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Powerfully conceived work of public art!

little suspended bodies tied up inside of this horse
little suspended bodies are tied up inside of this horse

larger proportioned figure of corpse in the horse on the right
A much larger proportioned human corpse rests inside the horse on the right

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Horse hooves must be a thing of value, or perhaps they were shoes/metal?


Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art

     Then there are the three figures in the back, obviously made from the same mold as the figure up front, but each individualized with netting and other small details.  They stand upon the necks of headless horses.  The bodies of the horses are made up of many skulls.  The visual language makes an obvious and clear heavy statement and yet the figures are beautiful at the same time.  The materials were not listed for this artwork but the surface texture looks like sand.  There are parts of horses’ faces that imply ceramic, although I think it was more likely colored or painted resin. 

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Do the African figures represent people or more like mast fronts on a ship?
Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Three horse bodies at the rear are made up of human skulls.

     An exhibition of this size is expensive to transport and to install.  However, I loved this work and the placement of it in Lucca.  I am curious how the same sculpture grouping looked and will look in the other cities along this tour.  If you happen to see it anywhere else, please share your images of it with me.

Enjoy.. I hope not too many photos!

Peace,

Kelly Borsheim, artist

P.S. IF original art, while affordable, is STILL a bit out of your budget, or the piece you adored has sold?  Or do you like arty things in different formats, to surround yourself with art?  Looking for a gift?  See my store online for pillow, phone cases, shower curtains, towels, tote bags, and yes, even prints on metal, wood, canvas, and so much more:

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
View from the gate at the bottom

Gustavo Aceves horses migration sculpture exhibition Lapidarium Passo Sospeso Lucca Italy public art
Imagine the quality of images from a GOOD camera!